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affordability. value. excellence.

The Value of An IU Education

The Value of An IU Education

    IU Bloomington Campus
  • Whether you choose one of our 180-plus majors or create your own, explore all the academic opportunities on campus or study overseas, you’ll get a high-quality education that will prepare you for whatever’s next. IU offers incredible choices and unique opportunities such as living communities, research and service learning that extend learning beyond the classroom and support student success.

  • You Can Have the World: IU offers more than 100 programs in 37 countries and nearly 20 languages (including English). More than 1,800 IUB students study abroad every year, making it a top 20 research university for study abroad. IU offers more than 70 foreign languages, including some that aren’t taught at any other American University.
  • President McRobbie
    IU is committed to keeping costs low, value high. Indiana University has been vigilant in implementing strategies in recent years to ensure that we return maximum value to Indiana taxpayers for the support they give us.
  • Read what the experts have to say! Kiplinger’s Personal Finance (February 2011) for the 2nd straight year, ranked IU in the top 30 of the “100 Best Values in Public Colleges.”
  • Check out the quality of the faculty. Our campus is home to more than 2,000 faculty, internationally recognized for their research and a deep commitment to teaching.
  • Consider the opportunities outside the classroom. With over 700 student organizations, students have any number of ways to gain leadership, connect with others and make the most of their experience.
  • Trust the track record. IU has more than 530,000 living graduates worldwide. Over 265,000 IU graduates live in Indiana. More than 50 percent of Indiana's physicians, 40 percent of nurses, 64 percent of optometrists, 35 percent of teachers, 75 percent of lawyers, and 90 percent of dentists are IU graduates. With career services for every area of study and an Alumni Association with over 100 chapters throughout the world, IU is committed to your success every step of the way.

Affordability. Value. Excellence.

Affordability. Value. Excellence.

Herman B Wells statue on the IU Bloomington Campus

Choosing a college is an important decision for families, particularly in these current economic times. More and more, families are concerned about the costs associated with college. As a future IU Hoosier exploring your options, you should consider the new knowledge you will gain, the opportunities and support you will discover, and the community of friends you will join.

IU students discover a community where their most idealistic goals can be achieved. We combine the benefit of personal attention for students with the resources of world-renowned schools, cutting edge programs, and an astonishing range of opportunities not only in the classroom, but on campus and even around the world. We take pride in the experience we can provide our students.

At IU, we know that a quality education can be affordable — but it can take some thought and planning. While you explore all that IU has to offer, check out the information on this site. There are countless ways for families to afford an IU education and benefit from its value. Let us help find the right path for you.

IU Bloomington Campus

Helping you Get to IU

Helping you Get to IU

Tips to help you plan ahead

  • Apply for Admission & IU Scholarships! The most important first step to get to IU is to apply for admission. And…by simply applying for admission by November 1, you will automatically be considered for Automatic Academic Scholarships. All application materials for admission must be submitted online or postmarked by November 1 for consideration. To learn more about these and other scholarship opportunities at IU, click here.
  • Search for external scholarships. Scholarships are financial assistance that do not require repayment and may be awarded based on merit, financial need, or a combination of both.
  • Don’t miss out by missing a deadline. Pay attention and read ahead. Don’t let missing a deadline for a financial aid form be a reason for missing an opportunity.
  • Understand your housing options. Housing areas vary in cost — check out all of the options and costs associated with them.
  • Have “the talk” with your family. In this case, we mean the talk about money. Have an honest conversation about what you, the student, should be expected to contribute and plan for how you will do that. Will your share be funded through part-time employment? Your own savings? Scholarships or loans? Having those questions agreed to now will be helpful later.
  • Practice budgeting yourself. A common success strategy for college students is tracking spending and planning for a budget. Start now to develop good habits.
IU Bloomington Campus

Breaking Down the College Bill

Breaking Down the College Bill

Helpful Information from CollegeBoard.com

Just what goes into all of your costs? Your total budget includes both billable and indirect costs.

Billable Costs
These are fixed costs, billed to you by the college tuition, fees, room and board.

Indirect Costs
These are the costs that don't show up on your bill from the college: books, supplies, travel, entertainment and other personal expenses such as laundry, telephone, and pizza. You can control your indirect costs somewhat by making smart spending choices.

From there, you can expect Five Basic Cost Components

  1. Tuition and Fees
    These are the costs of your education. While they may vary based on academic program and number of credit hours, this is a cost that is predicable for the academic year. The tuition charge will appear on the bill.
  2. Room and Board
    These costs are billed by the college if you live and take meals on campus. The charges are determined by the room and meal plan you choose, but are also announced for the year. If you plan to live off campus, you'll need to make your own estimate of these expenses.
  3. Books and Supplies
    This expense covers your course materials and will vary from semester to semester.
  4. Personal Expenses
    Keep careful track of these as they can quickly add up. These are costs over which you have more control based on your habits and lifestyle.
  5. Travel / Transportation
    This amount will also vary, depending on distance and frequency. Make your own estimates based on how and how often you plan to travel.


IU Cost of Attendance (2012-2013)

IU Cost of Attendance (2012-2013)

So what does it really cost to attend Indiana University? The Office of Student Financial Assistance estimates the cost of attending IU based on residency, enrollment (full or part time status) housing and other factors.

Below is the current cost of attendance (2012-2013) for a full-time undergraduate student. Direct costs are billed to the student through the IU Office of the Bursar. The indirect costs such as books, supplies, travel and other personal expenses are more likely to vary by student choices and lifestyle. These are the areas students can often find strategies to keep costs lower.

Estimated Cost of Attendance for Undergraduate Students, full-time, (2012-2013 Academic Year)
Resident Non-Resident
Tuition & Fees $10,034 $31,484
Room & Board * $8,854 $8,854
Books & Supplies * $848 $848
Total Direct Costs $19,736 $41,186
Transportation * $860 $860
Personal * $2,522 $2,522
Total Cost of Attendance $23,118 $44,568

*These are averages and actual costs can vary by student based on student choice and travel habits.

Variations in total costs at Indiana University can be found in:

  • Room and Board Costs: IU campus housing offers a variety of options to students. Your costs will be determined by your specific housing and meal plan choices. For more information about options on campus, review the current RPS Housing Guide.
  • Books and Supplies: This cost may vary each semester, based on your class requirements. Consider potential lab fees and other costs specific to your academic program.
  • Personal Expenses: This reflects your choices in everything from phone use to entertainment and non-board plan food costs. Review options on and near campus at little to no cost for entertainment.
  • Transportation: This may vary between students based on the number of times you travel from campus, and how you travel. Consider your options for sharing rides, traveling less frequently and planning ahead.


Net Price Calculator

Net Price Calculator

We want you to make an informed decision when choosing your college. The Net Price Calculator allows you to estimate your cost of attendance and financial aid eligibility at IU. Consider it an early estimate of the aid you may be eligible to receive. You can review the details of scholarships and need based programs at www.indiana.edu/~sfa. Current estimates are based on the 2012-2013 costs and criteria and are subject to change.

Estimate your cost to attent IU

Applying for Financial Aid

Applying for Financial Aid

IU’s Office of Student Financial Assistance offers a helpful timeline of financial matters important to students and their families.

The timeline walks you through the steps involved in having the most and best access to aid. It also explains what is included in each of these steps. Stay one step ahead and feel more informed by reviewing the complete timeline online now.

IU Bloomington Campus

There, you’ll learn about each of these steps:

  • Apply
  • Make Corrections
  • Review Your Financial Aid Award Notification
  • Complete Necessary Paperwork
  • Accept Federal Work-Study
  • Sign Promissory Notes
  • Seek Out Additional Funding
  • Pay Your Bill, or Look for Your Refund
  • Find a Job

From deadlines, to campus codes, to refunds and more—get in the know with the Financial Aid Timeline and Checklist.

You don’t have to figure it out alone! Our Financial Aid Counselors are available to help. Click here to get all of the information you need to call, email, or visit the Office of Student Financial Assistance.

Student Budgeting Tips

Student Budgeting Tips

Tips for saving money on campus

  • Academics
    • Maximize the flat fee rate. Take more than 12 credit hours but less than 18 credit hours, the tuition cost is the same.
    • Follow your curriculum plan. Meet with your academic advisor each semester to make sure you are on track for graduating in the time frame you need.
    • Consider buying used books. Local bookstores, and even some online sources, offer used books at a lower price when possible. If you’re concerned about their condition, check out the options at bookstores in person. You can decide how “used” suits you best.
  • Campus
    • Stick with your prepaid meal plan. Use the money you’ve already paid for meals and keep “eating out” to a minimum.
    • Take advantage of free campus activities. From movies on campus, to access to great museums, to recreation, festivals and special events, there is always something that you can do at no cost. It’s also a great chance to meet other students with similar interests. Campus isn’t the only exciting place — be sure to explore Bloomington and the surrounding area, too!
    • Make good use of what you’ve already paid for. Review and understand what your fees provide. Health Services. Recreational Sports Facilities. IU and Bloomington buses. Email, technology workshops and even printing those reports and term papers. We could go on and on.
  • Social Life
    • Look for great deals for students. At IU you have access to world-class music events, Broadway shows and exciting sports. And IU students get discounts and often free access to these events. Look for special IU student rates on everything from computers and software, to restaurants and other local business offering student discounts and deals.
    • Keep discretionary spending at a minimum. Create and stick to a budget for items such as clothing, entertainment and electronics.
    • Avoid using credit cards. Use cash or a debit card to avoid additional charges. Only use a credit card for emergencies.
    • Work part-time. Not only does it give you extra cash, but it can also help you connect in your chosen area of study, and can help you learn time management and other skills.
    • Leave car at home. Gas, maintenance and insurance are expensive. So is being the “taxi” for all your friends. IU is a “walking campus” with everything you need nearby. IU and city buses are easy to use and included in your student fees.

Helpful Links

Helpful Links

IU Bloomington Campus

The financial crisis facing our country has affected many families and their ability to finance a college education this year. Many families are struggling and college payment plans that were realistic last year may no longer be possible. We’re here to help.

We encourage all students to submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), regardless of family income.

Helpful Links Confused about the types of aid, the application process, and ways to get started? Below are some links to some great information:

Do You Have A Question?

Do You Have A Question?

Do you have a question about the financial aid process? Select from the following topic areas to find answers to your questions.


Applying for Aid

  1. What is the application process for financial aid?
  2. What is the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) and how does it affect financial aid?
  3. What is the cost of attendance?
  4. Is there a deadline for completing the FAFSA? If so, can students still receive financial aid after that deadline?
  5. Must the FAFSA be filed each year?
  6. Is a student with a high family income able to receive any financial aid from the FAFSA?
  7. Is completion of the FAFSA required to attend Indiana University?
  8. How do I account for special conditions in my financial aid?
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What are the eligibility requirements?

  1. What are the eligibility requirements to receive financial aid?
  2. What is Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)?
  3. What is Verification?
  4. Is financial aid available to international students?
  5. Does living on- or off-campus affect financial aid?
  6. How is a student’s dependency status determined and can it be changed?

What are Federal Loans?

  1. What is a Federal Direct Stafford Loan?
  2. What is the difference between subsidized and unsubsidized loans?
  3. What other loan options are available to students?
  4. Does a parent’s denial of a Federal Direct Parent PLUS loan make his/her student eligible for any additional financial aid?
  5. When does loan repayment begin?
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Other Types of financial aid

  1. How do students receive scholarships?
  2. How do students receive grants?
  3. What is Federal Work-Study?

How to contact our office?

Give Us A Call
Drop Us An E-mail
Visit Our Office

Office Of Scholarships
college.gov website
Free Application for Federal Student Aid