Events

9th Annual Dia de los Muertos Community Altar: An Invitation To Participate
Wednesday, October 15 to Sunday, November 2
The Dia de los Muertos Community Altar, installed by Bloomington artists Michael Redman and Rachel DiGregorio, celebrates ancestors, both distant and near. Community members are invited to contribute remembrances, tokens, and messages to the altar in honor of their deceased loved ones and ancestors. The altar will be open to the Tuesdays through Fridays, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays, from 1 to 4:30 p.m.


Cultural Heritage Informatics--From Display to Dialogue: Case Studies of Collaborative Methods in Interactive Media for Museums
Monday, October 20; 10 a.m.
Herman B Wells Library, Hazelbaker Lecture Hall, Room E159

Adrian Van Allen is an artist, designer, and anthropologist who has created exhibits and web sites for the Exploratorium, NASA, the Smithsonian, UC Berkeley, and the Cleveland Museum of Art. During this presentation she'll explore how collaboration has emerged in recent decades as a key concern for a broad range of academic disciplines and cultural institutions. As anthropology and public museums have searched for methods to integrate different kinds of knowledge from their source communities into exhibits and collections, the forms of collaboration and the kinds of representations they produce have correspondingly shifted. A similar shift from "display" to "dialogue" can also be charted within a series of institutional multimedia projects she created between 2006 and 2014. Case studies presented will include 'Evidence: How Do We Know What We Know?' for the Exploratorium, 'Digital Nineveh Archives' with UC Berkeley and the Iraqi Department of Antiquities, 'Ars Synthetica' with the Synthetic Biology Research Center (SynBerc) and Paul Rabinow, and 'Crafting Nature' a collaboration between Van Allen and scientists at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History during her dissertation fieldwork. Across these projects she'll examine how collaboration is conceptualized by participants, how the roles of stakeholders change through the development, design, and production processes, and how different perspectives can be leveraged to provide insight into the production of scientific knowledge such as archeological histories, narratives of human origins, and emerging synthetic biology techniques. The lecture is free and open to the public and part of the Cultural Heritage Informatics lecture series, organized in conjunction with the joint Digital Infrastructure Planning for OVPR Cultural Heritage Collections project of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology, with support from the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University.


Speaking of Food--Açaí From Local to Global
Friday, October 24; Noon
Eduardo Brondizio, Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University Bloomington, and Andrea Siqueira, Visiting Lecturer in International Studies Program at Indiana University Bloomington, will discuss their work surrounding the açaí berry (both are serving as curators of Açaí From Local to Global). Their presentation will describe the continuing role of the açaí berry for the Caboclo people of Brazil, building upon their research into açaí's global market expansion, and how that expansion is affecting the forest farmers who grow and supply the fruit. The free public lecture is part of Speaking of Food, a lecture series presented in conjunction with, and sponsored by, Themester 2014's "Eat, Drink, Think: Food from Art to Science," an initiative of the IU College of Arts and Sciences.


Halloween Family Fun Fest--Monsters
Sunday, October 26; 2-4 p.m.
The MMWC's annual Halloween celebration looks at monsters from around the world. Come learn about them, and make crafts and play games to scare the monsters away! Halloween Family Fun Fest is free and open to the public.


Cultural Heritage Informatics--Getting There: Building an Online Research Community
Monday, October 27; 10 a.m.
Herman B Wells Library, Hazelbaker Lecture Hall, Room E159

Nicholas Jakobsen and Ryan Wallace, co-founders of Culture Code (culture.ca), a software consulting company specializing in the development of cultural and research-focused web applications, will discuss the Reciprocal Research Network (RRN). The RRN is an online research environment codeveloped by the Musqueam Indian Band, the Stó:lo Nation/Stó:lo Tribal Council, the U'mista Cultural Society, and the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. It provides access to Northwest Coast items from 22 different partner institutions around the world, enabling geographically dispersed users and institutions including originating communities, academics and museum staff to carry out individual or collaborative cultural heritage research projects. Diverse user groups share their own perspectives and knowledge with the people and institutions that make up the RRN community. To date, almost 1,800 people have joined the RRN and collectively contributed over 3,000 discussions, projects, and pieces of shared knowledge. This vibrant community helped the RRN win the Gold Muse Award for Best Digital Community from the American Association of Museums in 2012. During development, the RRN team explored and tested methods to overcome challenges commonly faced by museums undertaking similar projects. Jakobsen and Wallace will discuss how the RRN is affecting research, why it is having this effect, and what course the development process followed. The lecture, which is free and open to the public, is part of the Cultural Heritage Informatics lecture series, organized in conjunction with the joint Digital Infrastructure Planning for OVPR Cultural Heritage Collections project of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology, with support from the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University. The lecture is free and open to the public and part of the Cultural Heritage Informatics lecture series, organized in conjunction with the joint Digital Infrastructure Planning for OVPR Cultural Heritage Collections project of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology, with support from the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University.


"Narrating Relations: Indigenous and Scientific Ways of Knowing"
Thursday, October 30; 4:15 p.m.

Jessica Bardill, an Assistant Professor in the Department of English, East Carolina University, will explore the limits of genetic ancestry testing as a scientific way of knowing, itself related to older and more pervasive narratives of blood and identity, particularly in the uses of the testing by and for indigenous peoples. Bardill specializes in the indigenous literatures of the US, particularly examining the intersections of cultures, literatures, sciences (especially genetics), and legal discourses, and her work engages the role of narrative medicine in wellness, ethical issues between communities and researchers, as well as the power of literature to resist and change national narrations of being and belonging. The lecture is free and open to the public, and sponsored by Indiana University's First Nations Educational and Cultural Center, Department of History, and the Center on Research on Race and Ethnicity on Society.


Speaking of Food--Coffee Ties the World Together (and Why Your Coffee Choices Matter)
Friday, October 31; Noon
Most adults in the USA drink coffee at least occasionally, but few know much about coffee's social, economic, and environmental impacts. Globally, coffee is one of the world's most valuable commodities, but it is produced by some of the poorest people. It has little nutritional value, yet it dominates some of the planet's most fertile and lush landscapes, and many consumers consider it to be the most important element of their breakfast. These contradictions have spurred the growth of fair trade and certifications for coffee, and have also drawn attention to inequities and conundrums of international trade relationships. This presentation, by Catherine Tucker, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University Bloomington, will explore some of coffee's contradictions, the ways that coffee production and consumption connects disparate peoples and places, and the implications raised for social, economic and environmental sustainability. Hoosier Fair Trade will have a table outside the event to offer free fair trade coffee and continue the conversation on the ethical issues that surround our favorite bean. The free public lecture is part of Speaking of Food, a lecture series presented in conjunction with, and sponsored by, Themester 2014's "Eat, Drink, Think: Food from Art to Science," an initiative of the IU College of Arts and Sciences.


Dia de los Muertos Community Altar Closing Reception
Saturday, November 1; 5:30-8 p.m.
Come celebrate and honor the memories of deceased loved ones at Bloomington's Dia de los Muertos Community Altar, installed by local artists Rachel Digregorio and Michael Redmond. The event is free and open to the public.


Freshman Family Tour
Saturday, November 8; 2 p.m.
Explore the Mathers Museum of World Cultures during a free Freshman Family Tour highlighting the museum exhibits and collections. Musical instruments from around the globe, special exhibitions related to food, and a visit to 1967 await! Free parking is available by the museum's lobby entrance and on surrounding streets during the weekend.


"Journey of the Human Spirit": A Lecture and Concert by Ed Kabotie
Friday, November 14; 4:30 p.m.

Ed Kabotie, an artist and musician, will give a lecture and musical reaction to his father's mural, Journey of the Human Spirit (Michael Kabotie, 1942-2009). Through his original music and art, Kabotie will focus on his father's art and the journey of the Pueblo people of New Mexico and Arizona--the mythic and historic past, troubled present, and prophetic future. Ed Kabotie is from the Hopi village of Shungopavi and the Tewa village of Khap'o Owinge (Santa Clara Pueblo, NM). His culture serves as the inspiration for his music. By mixing genres, languages, and instrumentation, Ed Kabotie seeks to express the virtues, values, and vices of his people. The event will be free and open to the public, and sponsored by Indiana University Bloomington College of Arts and Science, the First Nations Educational and Cultural Center, the Native American Graduate Student Association, the Department of American Studies, Native American and Indigenous Studies, the Department of Anthropology, and WFHB Bloomington Community Radio.


Family Craft Day--Making Music
Sunday, November 16; 2-3:30 p.m.
Come join us for this free, fun, and sustainable event and make harmonicas, drums, and other musical instruments out of household objects (bring an empty soda or water bottle to make your own maraca!).


Scene at the Museum: Performing Exhibits and Exhibiting Performance
Wednesday, December 3; Noon

This talk, by Dr. Beth Kattleman, Associate Professor/Curator of Theater at the Lawrence and Lee Theater Research Institute at Ohio State University, will explore the synergy between exhibits and performance, focusing in particular on how puppets are especially potent in their ability to evoke the stories of a specific time and place. Every artifact contains a story, and it is a curator's responsibility to help unlock these stories and bring them to life for museum visitors. A puppet is an artifact that perhaps best "embodies" performance and culture, whether still or in motion. As a human simulacrum, the puppet often captures the look and feel of a culture in ways that other artifacts do not. Puppets can look like human beings (more or less), and even in stillness, they denote a performance in which they may move like human beings, perform human acts, and exhibit human emotions. The event will be free and open to the public.


WinterFest--Creating Cookbooks and Other Gifts
Sunday, December 7; 2-3:30 p.m.
Bring your favorite recipes and we'll help you turn them into a special cookbook to be given as a gift this holiday season. Also, colleagues from BloomingLabs will drop by to teach us how to make pop-up cards. And while you're here we'll work on other gift-worthy crafts during this free public event.


Exhibit Opening--Still/Moving: Puppets and Indonesia
Friday, December 12; 4:30-6 p.m.
Join us for the opening of Still/Moving: Puppets and Indonesia, curated by students in T775: Museums and Performance class, taught by Jennifer Goodlander, Assistant Professor of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance. The exhibit uses puppets, one of the oldest types of Indonesian performing arts, which still persists today in many forms, as a way to better understand the dynamic peoples and places of Indonesia--focusing on Javanese, Sundanese, and Balinese cultures. The event will feature presentations by the students, followed by a reception, and will be free and open to the public.