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Lotus World Music and Arts Festival

Wed, Sep 25, 4:00 pm to Sun, Sep 29, 5:00 pm
Downtown Bloomington, IN

 

 

The Lotus World Music & Arts Festival and the

 

 Inner Asian Uralic National Resource Center Present


Srinivas Krishnan, Abbos Kosimov, Homayun Sakhi, and Friends

Friday, September 27, First Christain Center, 10:30 - 11:45 p.m.

 

Percussionist Srinivas Krishnan plays the tabla, ghatam, mridangam, dumbek, and bodhran, and

is known for bringing diverse world music ensembles together on Lotus stages. This year, he is

joined by Uzbek percussionist Abbos Kosimov on the doyra (a frame drum, with jingles, that is

common to Central Asia music) and Afghan musician Homayun Sakhi on the rubab, a doublechambered

plucked lute with origins in Afghanistan and Pakistan. With special guests

percussionist Jamey Haddad and violinist Dr. M. Lalitha.


Frigg

Thursday, September 26, Buskirk-Chumley Theater (114 E. Kirkwood), 7 p.m (doors open at 6:30 p.m.)

Friday, September 27, Buskirk-Chumley Theater (114 E. Kirkwood), 8:45 -10:00 p.m.

 

Frigg plays some of the most exciting string music you’ll ever hear — bank of fiddles; an upright

bass; guitar; mandolin – in a lyrical and often break-neck style that is three parts Nordic newgrass

and one part American bluegrass. (They call this “Nordgrass.”) When the band first came to

Lotus, in 2004, they were relatively new on the Nordic string scene, and had one CD to their

name. Almost 10 years later, they tour the world all the time, and they’ve made lots of friends and

fans in Bloomington. It’s traditional music on acoustic instruments – but supercharged.

 

Kardemimmit

Friday, September 27, First United Methodist Church, 10:30 - 11:45 p.m.

Saturday, September 28, IU Global Village, 12:15 - 1:00 p.m.

Saturday, September 28, First United Methodist Church, 7:15 - 8:15 p.m.

Sunday September 29, Buskirk-Chumley Theater (114 E. Kirkwood) 3 – 5 p.m.

 

The four young women of Kardemimmit are all singers, and all play the Finnish national

instrument – the kantele. They perform old songs as well as their own modern, original folk music

that is the newest version of a long tradition. If you’re new to the kantele, think zither or dulcimer:

the quartet play both the 15-stringed and 38-stringed variety. The distinctive sound of this

plucked acoustic instrument and their strong yet delicate vocal harmonies make Kardemimmit a

stand-out contemporary Nordic ensemble. With Frigg, they give the 20th Lotus its strongest

Finnish flavor ever.

For performance times, dates, tickets, and to learn more visit lotusfest.org