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Visiting Faculty

Gabriel Peoples

Gabriel Peoples
Postdoctoral Fellow
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Research Interests: Black performance theory, visual culture, intersections of race and gender, and HIV prevention.  

Gabriel Peoples is a Postdoctoral fellow who works in the areas of Performance, Gender, and Africana Studies. He seeks to advance interdisciplinary research that addresses the representations and lived experiences of Black men and women in scenes of social constraint and creativity. Currently, he is preparing a manuscript that examines the rewards and risks of repeated visual and sonic performances of Blackness in popular culture and everyday life, which are packaged as images, films, and viral videos for mass consumption. He argues that while this Black virality supports commonsense ideologies about Black bodies, it also creates paths of alterity where Blackness is challenged, its histories renegotiated, and subjectivities (dis)identified with.

His writing is forthcoming in The Black Scholar’s special issue on Black Code Studies. His interests include Black performance theory, visual culture, intersections of race and gender, and HIV prevention. Peoples desires to inspire people to use their imaginations creatively and critically to think seriously about how their words and bodies wield the power to change minds and create worlds.

Jeanne Vaccaro

Jeanne Vaccaro
Postdoctoral Fellow
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Research Interests: Gender and sexuality studies, visual culture and aesthetics, feminist science studies, transgender theory and politics, and queer archives and method.
 

Jeanne Vaccaro received her Ph.D. in Performance Studies at New York University and B.A. in Women’s Studies and Sociology at Smith College. Her areas of research and teaching are: gender and sexuality studies, visual culture and aesthetics, feminist science studies, transgender theory and politics, and queer archives and method.

Jeanne is completing a book manuscript about the sensory and “handcrafted” labor of transgender identities. Handmade: the Feelings and Textures of Transgender Embodiment thinks at the intersection of transgender, craft, and affect theory, and examines the fibrous and fleshy modes of bodily capacity in close readings of knitting, soft sculpture, visual culture, dance, and performance art.

She is the editor of “The Transbiological Body,” a special issue of Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory bridging transgender and science studies. Her scholarly writing has also been published in The Transgender Studies Reader II, TSQ, Radical History Review, GLQ, Social Text, and The Journal of Modern Craft.

Previously Jeanne held the 2012-14 Mellon postdoctoral fellowship in Sexuality Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. There she taught graduate seminars in transgender theory and feminist methods, curated “TransOcular: visions in transgender art, media & politics,” and co-organized a symposium on Queer Method.

Jeanne is a longtime volunteer with the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, working as part of the Movement Building Team and on the host committee for the art auction Small Works for Big Change. She is a co-founder of the NYC Trans Oral History Collective, a community-led oral history project that centers those most marginalized within existing accounts of LGBT history.

Allison Vandenberg

Allison Vandenberg
Visiting Assistant Professor
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Research Interests: Gendered beauty practices, embodiment, phenomenology, feminist and queer theory, the history of gender and sexuality, and representations of gender and sexuality in popular culture.  

Allison Vandenberg completed her PhD in Gender Studies with a minor in History at Indiana University in 2016. Her current book project, I Feel Pretty: Phenomenology, Embodiment, and Beauty Practices 1945-1985 examines the phenomenological experiences produced through women’s engagement in beauty practices in the United States between 1945 and 1985. She argues that, rather than attempting to sort beauty practices into “good” or “bad” set of practices, it is far more productive to consider the extent to which beauty practices produce or inhibit phenomenological expansiveness. Allison was the recipient of the 2015-2016 Mabel LaDuke Lauder Dissertation Year Fellowship. In addition to teaching in the Department of Gender Studies at IU, she has also taught courses in the Department of Telecommunications, the Collins Living-Learning Center, and the Global Village Living-Learning Center. Her publications include “The Somatechnics of Hair Straightening: Technology, Transformation, and Social Change" in (Re)Possessing Beauty: Politics, Poetics, Change, edited by Sallie McNamara.