Indiana University Bloomington
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Course Descriptions

Courses in WEST are all currently numbered at or above the 300 level. Both undergraduate and graduate students may enroll in courses at the 300 and 400 level; graduate students in those courses usually have additional coursework requirements. The following descriptions of WEST courses are not intended to offer more than a brief outline. If a course is not listed in the Graduate School Bulletin, it may not count for graduate credit.

Fall 2012 Course List
Spring 2012 Course List

IU Schedule of Classes
IU Course Descriptions

WEUR E100 Beginning Modern Greek I (4 cr.)
This course, which meets with E491, is designed to provide students with fundamental communication skills in Modern Greek. It will also serve as a foundation for continued learning. Students completing the course will emerge with a basic level of communicative proficiency that includes core vocabulary and an understanding of how to use basic nouns, basic adjectives, numbers, and basic verb tenses (present, simple past, and simple future). Additionally, they will be able to recognize and respond to commands, to use personal pronouns, to conduct basic conversations, and to read and write basic sentences. Classes will contain a mixture of structured conversation activities, listening exercises, and brief presentations that will highlight new syntax and grammar. Discussion activities will focus on the themes presented in the textbook dialogues and readings. The textbook material will be supplemented by homework assignments posted on Oncourse. E491 is for graduate reading knowledge. Credit will not count toward degree. I Sem.
WEUR E150 Beginning Modern Greek II (4 cr.)
Beginning Modern Greek II builds upon the foundation that was established in E100. The course is designed to expand fundamental communication skills in Modern Greek, building vocabulary and increasing familiarity with grammar and syntax. It will also serve as a foundation for continued learning. Students completing the course will emerge with an intermediate level of communicative proficiency, one that will prepare them for travel and study-abroad opportunities, allowing them to conduct the day-to-day business of living in Greek. Over the course of the semester, we will work to expand our vocabularies, build our familiarity with the major families of nouns and adjectives, and acquire the ability to communicate using the major verb families and the majority of verb tenses. Additionally, students completing the course will increase their ability to recognize and respond to commands, to use personal pronouns, to conduct increasingly complex conversations, and to read and write increasingly complex prose. Classes will contain a mixture of structured conversation activities, listening exercises, and brief presentations that will highlight new syntax and grammar. Discussion activities will focus on the themes presented in the textbook dialogues and readings. The textbook material will be supplemented by homework assignments posted on Oncourse. This course will also contain a bi-weekly cultural knowledge component designed to help students explore different facets of contemporary Greek culture. Students will be expected to complete an end-of-the-semester project relating to this cultural-knowledge component. Prerequisite: E100 or equivalent. E492 is for graduate advanced reading knowledge. Credit will not count toward degree. Prerequisite: E491 or equivalent. II Sem.
WEUR E200 Second-Year Modern Greek (3 cr.)
This course, which is designed for students who have completed E150 or who have achieved a similar level of fluency by other means, is designed to help intermediate students improve their communicative competency in Modern Greek and continue to develop facility with grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Students completing the course will able to communicate in a wide variety of contexts with a reasonable level of fluency. Additionally, they will have mastered the basics of Modern Greek grammar: all major verb families in all active-voice tenses and most passive-voice tenses and most major families of nouns and adjectives. The course will begin with a two-week review of first-year grammar and vocabulary. After completing this review, we’ll enter into our normal routine, which consists of a mixture of structured listening exercises, conversation activities, and brief presentations that highlight new syntax and grammar. Homework assignments, posted on Oncourse, will usually be due at the beginning of the first two classes of the week. The third day of each week begins with a brief quiz. The remainder of the class period will then be devoted to activities that are centered on our class project, H Πολυκατοικία or The Apartment Building, through which we’ll be creating an imaginary apartment building in Greece, and populating it with fictional inhabitants. Weekly activities will involve role-playing/discussion activities that are organized around a specific issue or theme. Students will be required to do on-line and/or traditional research in order to prepare for many of the topics.
WEUR E250 Readings in Modern Greek Writers (3 cr.)
This course, which meets with E492, is intended for students who have completed E200 or who have achieved a similar level of fluency. The course is designed to help advanced intermediate students improve their communicative competency in Modern Greek by acquiring advanced vocabulary and mastering increasingly intricate aspects of Modern Greek grammar and syntax, including the passive and conditional voices. Students completing the course will possess an advanced level of facility that will allow them—through the process of immersion—to pursue increasing levels of fluency in situ through travel, study-abroad, and/or research opportunities. An additional emphasis of the course will be building cultural literacy. Students will acquire familiarity with a broad swath of contemporary Greek culture through weekly cultural literacy activities that will focus on historically informed discussions of a wide variety of literary and popular culture texts, including poems, short stories, films, television shows, popular music, and various new-media texts.
WEUR E300 Advanced Modern Greek I: Cultural Literacy and Current Events (3 cr.)
This course, designed for students who have completed E250, assists advanced students in developing both their communicative competency in Modern Greek and their awareness of Greek cultural and society. E250’s emphasis on popular culture will be continued and augmented with a focus on current events. Prerequisite: E250 or equivalent.
WEUR E350 Advanced Modern Greek II: Literature, History, and Cinema (3 cr.)
This course, designed for students who have completed E300, assists advanced students in developing both their communicative competency in Modern Greek and their awareness of Greece’s culture and history. In particular, the course will focus on improving language skills by engaging Greek history through literature and cinema. Prerequisite: E300 or equivalent. Carries A&H credit and Culture Studies B credit.
WEUR E491 Elementary Modern Greek for Graduate Students (3 cr.)
This course, which meets with E100, is designed to provide students with fundamental communication skills in Modern Greek. It will also serve as a foundation for continued learning. Students completing the course will emerge with a basic level of communicative proficiency that includes core vocabulary and an understanding of how to use basic nouns, basic adjectives, numbers, and basic verb tenses (present, simple past, and simple future). Additionally, they will be able to recognize and respond to commands, to use personal pronouns, to conduct basic conversations, and to read and write basic sentences. Classes will contain a mixture of structured conversation activities, listening exercises, and brief presentations that will highlight new syntax and grammar. Discussion activities will focus on the themes presented in the textbook dialogues and readings. The textbook material will be supplemented by homework assignments posted on Oncourse. E491 is for graduate reading knowledge. Credit will not count toward degree. I Sem.
WEUR E492 Readings in Modern Greek for Graduate Students (3 cr.)
Beginning Modern Greek II builds upon the foundation that was established in E100. The course is designed to expand fundamental communication skills in Modern Greek, building vocabulary and increasing familiarity with grammar and syntax. It will also serve as a foundation for continued learning. Students completing the course will emerge with an intermediate level of communicative proficiency, one that will prepare them for travel and study-abroad opportunities, allowing them to conduct the day-to-day business of living in Greek. Over the course of the semester, we will work to expand our vocabularies, build our familiarity with the major families of nouns and adjectives, and acquire the ability to communicate using the major verb families and the majority of verb tenses. Additionally, students completing the course will increase their ability to recognize and respond to commands, to use personal pronouns, to conduct increasingly complex conversations, and to read and write increasingly complex prose. Classes will contain a mixture of structured conversation activities, listening exercises, and brief presentations that will highlight new syntax and grammar. Discussion activities will focus on the themes presented in the textbook dialogues and readings. The textbook material will be supplemented by homework assignments posted on Oncourse. This course will also contain a bi-weekly cultural knowledge component designed to help students explore different facets of contemporary Greek culture. Students will be expected to complete an end-of-the-semester project relating to this cultural-knowledge component. Prerequisite: E100 or equivalent. E492 is for graduate advanced reading knowledge. Credit will not count toward degree. Prerequisite: E491 or equivalent. II Sem.
WEUR E580 Advanced Modern Greek I: Culture, Literature and Current Events (3 cr.)
This course, designed for students who have completed E250, assists advanced students in developing both their communicative competency in Modern Greek and their awareness of Greek cultural and society. E250’s emphasis on popular culture will be continued and augmented with a focus on current events. Prerequisite: E250 or equivalent.
WEUR E581 Advanced Modern Greek II: Literature, History and Cinema (3 cr.)
This course, designed for students who have completed E300, assists advanced students in developing both their communicative competency in Modern Greek and their awareness of Greece’s culture and history. In particular, the course will focus on improving language skills by engaging Greek history through literature and cinema. Prerequisite: E300 or equivalent. Carries A&H credit and Culture Studies B credit.
WEUR W301 Modern European Politics and Society (3 cr.)
Covers the politics, economics, and social structures of Western European countries. Examination of selected domestic and international issues, including the welfare states, the European community, and West-East European relations. This is a WEST core course and is required for a WEST degree.
WEUR W304 Model European Union (1-3 cr.)
A course with two interrelated parts. The first involves an analysis of the decision-making powers of the European Union (EU). This analysis then leads to a formal simulation of the EU. This course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credit hours.
WEUR W325 European Issues in a Foreign Language (1 cr.)
The European Issues in a Foreign Language (EIFL) course is a one-credit course designed to be taught in conjunction with a subject course offered in a discipline. The course therefore changes on a semester by semester basis. The EIFL will be scheduled to meet one hour per week. The goal of this course is to give students the opportunity to use their language skills in disciplines other than their language courses. Class should be conducted in the target language with the goal of developing all four aspects of this language - comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing - while covering subject content. This course will fulfill a Title VI mandate of offering language across the curriculum courses.
WEUR W401 Topics in European Intellectual History (3 cr.)
A survey of modern European intellectual history from the French Revolution to the present. Open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students.
WEUR W405 Special Topics in European Studies (3 cr.)
Selected ideas, trends, and problems in contemporary Western Europe from the perspective of social and behavioral sciences. Specific topics will be announced each semester. May be repeated for up to 12 credit hours with different topics. I Sem., II Sem.
WEUR W406 Special Topics in European Studies (3 cr. )
Selected ideas, trends, and problems in contemporary Western Europe from the perspective of arts and humanities. Specific topics will be announced each semester. May be repeated for up to 12 credit hours with different topics. I Sem., II Sem., SS.
WEUR W501 The Economics of European Integration (3 cr.)
Study of the integration of the economies of the member states of the European Union (EU) since the Treaty of Rome; economic policy making institutions and the EU budget; economic theory of a customs union and a single market; imperfections in the single market, including unemployment; monetary integration and monetary union; common policies and reforms; widening of the EU to the east and south; and emphasis on relevant current events.
WEUR W504 Model European Union (1-3 cr.)
Analysis of the decision-making powers of the European Union (EU). Formal simulation of the EU. Course may be repeated for credit.
WEUR W605 Greek Cinema and the National Cinema Question (3 cr.)
Like most world cinemas, Greek cinema has been marked, since its inception, by a tension between the impulse toward cosmopolitanism and a perceived duty to represent the space of the nation. Though this tension has been a constant, it has not been uniform. The national mission of cinema in Greece has been affected—at times strengthened, at times attenuated— by both historical exigencies and more subtle shifts in cultural attitudes and social values. This course traces the historical trajectory of cinema in Greece, refracting films and film culture through both major historical events (the Occupation, the Civil War, the Truman Doctrine, the Junta, membership in the EU) and broader cultural, social, and economic trends (modernity, orientalism, the infiltration of consumer culture, immigration, the expansion of the tourist economy). Additionally, students will become versed in current debates about the possibility and desirability of using the nation as an analytical category for thinking about cinematic trends and movements, acquiring, in the process, a comparative basis for thinking about Greek cinema.
WEUR W605 Violence, Critique, and Narrative: The United States, Greece, and the Wars of Yugoslav Succession (3 cr. )
This upper-level, interdisciplinary course explores the history of violence, particularly interethnic violence, and its representation in two distinct, but interrelated geographical contexts, the United States and Europe’s Balkan periphery. Readings address 1) the history of culture and conflict in both contexts and 2) critical approaches to the questions of violence and human progress. This historical and critical background serves as a foundation for discussing a variety of films including: John Ford’s Fort Apache, Sam Peckinpah’s The Wild Bunch, Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather, Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction, Michael Moore’s Bowling for Columbine, Emir Kusturica’s Underground and Black Cat, White Cat, Danis Tanovic’s No Man’s Land, Milcho Manchevsky’s Before the Rain and Dust, Dinos Katsouridis’s What Did You Do in the War, Thanassis?, and Theo Angelopoulos’s The Travelling Players.
WEUR W605 The Politics and Play of Rap in Greece and Europe (3 cr. )
This course explores the cultural dynamics of rap music, a very familiar American cultural form, in Greece. We will begin by exploring the global origins of American rap music and then proceed to examine a segment of the global spread of this genre. In particular, students will be asked to examine the religious, gender, and class dynamics of rap in Europe. In the process of making this music culturally intelligible to students, they will be introduced to a broad swath of European history generally and Greek history in particular. Topics touched upon will include: colonialism and postcolonialism, Islam and Europe (including the Ottoman Empire and Europe), American influence in Europe (including the Marshall Plan and the Truman Doctrine), the post-World-War-II European order and the European Union, the current Greek economic crisis, and commercial expansion and globalization. The broad, interdisciplinary focus of the course will allow students to emerge with both specific knowledge and analytical skills that will allow them to think critically in other contexts. Course carries A&H and Culture Studies B credit.
WEUR W605 Selected Topics in European Studies (1.5-4 cr.)
The West European Studies section of courses that can be taken for graduate credit.
WEUR W800 MA Thesis Hours (1-3 cr.)
Students working on their M.A. thesis may enroll for thesis hours. Thesis hours should not be taken until an M.A. Thesis Committee has been approved by the Chairman. Both the number of thesis hours taken in any semester and the total number of thesis hou rs included in the M.A. program are determined by the student and the chairperson. Thesis hours receive a deferred grade (R) until final submission of the thesis.

EURO Brown Bag Seminars, Fall 2014

 

EURO receives CILC Pinnacle Award-Honorable Mention for 2013-2014!