Support a Key Project, Multicultural Initiative, or Center on Diversity

Individuals who want to help advance the mission of the Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs can do so by contributing to a special project.


Key Projects

IU-HBCU STEM Summer Scholars Program

The Summer Scholars Institute is a component of the IU-HBCU STEM Initiative, which is a science, technology, engineering, and math academic partnership between Indiana University and eleven historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs): Alabama A&M University, Bennett College for Women, Clark Atlanta University, Hampton University, Jackson State University, Langston University, Morehouse College, Morgan State University, North Carolina Central University, Tennessee State University, and Xavier University of Louisiana.

The STEM Initiative is intended to attract students from HBCUs and channel them into IU graduate research programs in support of the initiative's effort to help increase the number of underrepresented STEM discipline faculty researchers. The institute is a nine-week summer program of IU and HBCU student participation in research projects conducted by IU faculty on the Bloomington and IUPUI campuses. Institute outcomes include student presentations and posters and the development of a graduate education and continuing research plan for the home institution. Scholars receive a $4,000 stipend, room, and board. The number of Summer Scholars doubled from 11 in 2007 to 22 in 2008. One of the scholars from the 2007 cohort was successfully recruited as the first Herbert Presidential Scholar Ph.D. student in neurosciences. The Summer Scholars Institute is in its infancy, but if allowed to grow and mature it should help expand a graduate student pipeline of African American STEM and other discipline students into IU's graduate and professional degree programs and enhance opportunities for attracting minority faculty across campuses and disciplines. The IU commitment for three years of funding in support of the Summer Scholars Institute ended with the completion of the 2009 summer cohort. The annual operating cost to support a full complement of 30 scholars is $255,000.

Classic IU Pre-Collegiate Program

The Indiana University Office of Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs inaugurated the "Classic IU" Pre-Collegiate Program during the 2008 Circle City Classic Weekend in Indianapolis as a new initiative to increase student diversity at Indiana University. Circle City Classic is one of the largest events of its kind in the US, attracting 150,000 each year for the annual weekend celebration and convocation of cultural events, concerts, comedy shows, luncheons, galas, and exhibits highlighted by a parade and football game between two historically black colleges and universities. Classic IU uses the Circle City Classic venue to facilitate access to higher education for students from low-income, first generation, and/or underrepresented populations. Classic IU is a partnership between the IU academic community and community school systems in targeted cities. During the inaugural event, middle and high school students from Bloomington, Indianapolis, and Kokomo were invited to participate in the program, which was hosted on the campus of IUPUI. Funding is needed to expand the program content and to include underrepresented students from other cities.

Adam W. Herbert Presidential Scholars and 21st Century Scholars Program Support

The Herbert Presidential Scholars Program and the 21st Century Scholars Program are excellent vehicles of scholarship support for high achieving undergraduate students. However, a significant shortcoming of both scholarships is that they fail to provide programmatic activities that support camaraderie, persistence, and a sense of community among scholars. Students and supporters have recommended that programmatic content be added to supplement the overall scholarship experience. Many of the scholars can be accommodated by existing DEMA activities and programs. For example, 18 of the 54 Bloomington-based Adam W. Herbert Presidential Scholars who entered IU in 2008 were also Hudson and Holland Scholars and are advantaged by the Hudson and Holland Scholars Program content. Additional funding, however, is needed to cover the cost of program coordination and integration and the added participation of scholars who are not part of the Hudson and Holland Scholars Program.

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Multicultural Initiatives

The Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs works collaboratively with other units within and outside of IU to present or co-sponsor diversity and multicultural programs that: a) promote diversity; b) provide learning experiences for students and community members; c) enhance recruitment and retention; d) build relationships among students, among members of the IU community, and across communities; and e) provide opportunities of collaboration.

Your financial support will help to: 1) increase our potential to create and participate in innovative programming; 2) increase our level of collaboration with other academic and support units across the university; and 3) provide increased and consistent financial assistance for student group activities. In supporting our multicultural initiatives, you also can designate your contribution toward building upon and expanding the programs and services of any of the following:

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Center on Diversity

The IU Center on Diversity was established as a resource center in 2006 in the model of other successful freestanding, multidisciplinary centers at IU. The goals of the center are to 1) infuse diversity into the curriculum across all campuses, schools and programs; 2) engage the university community in open dialogue on key issues of race, equity, and diversity; 3) pursue equity and excellence for populations of underrepresented groups; and 4) enhance cultural competence for all IU students, administrators, faculty and staff. The center would be an authoritative resource on the higher education status of underrepresented minorities in Indiana, possessing an inventory of best practices. It would respond to campus/state issues and undertake such projects as: the implementation of faculty workshops; the preparation of reports on the status of diversity at IU (e.g., university-wide diversity scorecard); the performance of campus climate assessments across the university; and the sponsorship and conduct of diversity conferences, symposia, institutes, and student leadership development programs.

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