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Indiana University Bloomington
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Class Observations

Our instructional consultants use research-based methods for observing and providing feedback on your class. Many instructors find these observations useful to their growth as teachers, in part because they are completely confidential and can be conducted without any fear of affecting one’s relationships within one’s home department. The general procedure for these observations is:

  1. Arrange a consultation to discuss your goals for the class to be observed and the specific elements of the class that you would like the consultant to focus upon. You can do this by making an appointment or by calling 855–9023.
  2. The consultant will come to the class you designate and take notes on the class. Often these notes will be extensive (10–12 pages) so do not be disconcerted if the consultant seems to be writing a great deal!
  3. A few days after the observation, you will meet again with the consultant to talk about how the class went. The consultant not only serves as a sounding board for your own thoughts, relating those thoughts to the appropriate research on teaching and learning, but also serves to model a beginning learner in your discipline. Often the jargon and tools of a discipline become invisible to the experienced instructor, and the consultant can serve to identify issues of possible concern to beginning learners in the class.

Videorecording Your Class

Having yourself videorecorded during a class is an excellent way to see yourself as your students do. This resource provides information about how to record your class for a variety of purposes: for formative feedback, for student use, or to record a guest speaker. If you would like to record your class yourself using an iPad or iPhone, you may want to refer to this resource for tips and instructions.

Please note that CITL consultants will observe your class as a way of providing formative feedback and helping you improve your teaching.  We do not, however, provide letters or other evaluations of your teaching for use within promotion and tenure dossiers.