Indiana University Bloomington
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Inner Asian & Uralic National Resource Center (IAUNRC) Sinor Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies (SRIFIAS) Center for Languages of the Central Asian Region (CeLCAR) Summer Language Workshop (SWSEEL)

Lynn Hooker :: Faculty

Picture of Lynn Hooker

Associate Professor, Central Eurasian Studies
Director of Undergraduate Studies, Central Eurasian Studies
Director of Graduate Studies, Central Eurasian Studies
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Folklore/Ethnomusicology
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Musicology

Office: Goodbody Hall 235
Phone: (812) 856-0167
E-mail: lhooker@indiana.edu
https://iub.academia.edu/LynnHooker

Education

Ph. D. University of Chicago 2001
M. A. University of Chicago 1994

Research Interests

Music and modernism, particularly in Hungary and in the careers of Béla Bartók and Franz Liszt; Eastern European minority issues, particularly those related to the Roma (Gypsies) and the minorities of Transylvania; gender in music and dance; national, transnational, and global identities, especially as seen though music.

Courses Recently Taught

Publication Highlights

Books (refereed publications marked with an asterisk*)

* “Hungarian Music Education in the Twentieth Century: Voices, Instruments, Classicism and Ethnicity in the Kodály and Rajkó Methods.” AHEA: E-journal of the American Hungarian Educators Association, 2013. http://ahea.net/e-journal/volume-6-2013/14

“Stage Turks, Hungarians, and Gypsies: Exoticism and Auto-exoticism in Opera and Operetta,” Hungarian Studies 27, no. 2 (2013), 289-309.

“Dancing On The Edge Of A Volcano: East European Roma Performers Respond To Social Transformation.” Hungarian Studies 25, no. 2 (2011), 287-302.

“Ideas about musical Hungarianness in early Hungarian musicology,” in Music’s Intellectual History, ed. Zdravko Blazekovic and Barbara Dobbs Mackenzie (New York: Répertoire International de Littérature Musicale, 2009), 565-580.

“Performing the Old, Embracing the New: Festivalization, the Carnivalesque, and the Creation and Maintenance of Community in North American Hungarian Folk Music and Dance Camps,” Hungarian Studies 22, no. 1-2 (2008), 89-101.

* “Controlling the Liminal Power of Performance: Hungarian Scholars and Romani Musicians in the Hungarian Folk Revival,” Twentieth-Century Music 3, no. 1 (March 2007), 51-72.

* “Modernism on the Periphery: Béla Bartók and the New Hungarian Music Society of 1911-1912,” Musical Quarterly 88, no. 2 (Summer 2005), 274-319.

“Gypsiness and Gender in the Hungarian Folkdance Revival,” Anthropology of East Europe Review 23, no. 2 (Autumn 2005), 52-62.

“Transylvania and the Politics of the Musical Imagination,” in European Meetings in Ethnomusicology 9 (2002), 45-76.

“ ‘Solving the Problem of Hungarian Music’: Contexts for Bartók’s Early Career,” International Journal of Musicology 9 (2001), 11-42.

“The political and cultural climate of turn-of-the-century Hungary,” in The Cambridge Companion to Bartók, ed. Amanda Bayle(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001), 7-23.

Current Research Projects