Indiana University

Sources in American Indian Oral Literature

bead design

For more information or to purchase any of the books in this series, please visit the University of Nebraska Press.

Browse all books   1  2  3


The Semantics of Time Aspectual Categorization in Koyukon Athabaskan

Melissa Axelrod
Cloth: 1993, xii, 200
CIP.LC 92-42719,0-8032-1032-9

The Semantics of Time Aspectual Categorization in Koyukon Athabaskan book cover The languages of the Athabascan family are noted for their rich aspectual systems—inventories of grammatical forms that denote the nature of the action of a verb in relation to its beginning, duration, completion, or repetition, but without reference to its position in time. Koyukon is an Athabaskan language spoken along the Yukon and Koyukuk rivers in Alaska. Among Athabaskan languages, Koyukon has the most elaborate and profusely varied possibilities of morphologically marked derivational aspect.

This work comprises three parts. The first describes the aspectual system, which sorts out a complex network of four modes, fifteen aspects, four superaspects, and some three hundred aspect-dependent derivation prefix strings. The second analyzes the organization of verb theme categories, which are directly linked to aspectual categories. The last assesses the function of the aspectual system as a whole.

MELISSA AXELROD received a Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Colorado in lggo. She has worked for the Alaska Native Language Center, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, and currently teaches in the English Department at California State University, San Bernardino.

Back to Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians

Tales from Maliseet Country

Philip S. LeSourd
Cloth: 2007, 200
ISBN : 978-0-8032-2962-4

Tales from Maliseet Country book cover During the summer of 1963, Harvard linguist Karl V. Teeter traveled along the Saint John River, the great thoroughfare of Native New Brunswick, Canada, with his principal Maliseet consultant, Peter Lewis Paul. Together they recorded a series of tales from Maliseet elders whom Paul regarded as among the best Maliseet storytellers born before 1900, including Charles Laporte, Matilda Sappier, Solomon Polchies, William Saulis, and Alexander Sacobie. Paul also contributed eleven narratives of his own.

Tales from Maliseet Country presents the transcripts and translations of the texts Teeter collected, together with one tale recorded by linguist Philip S. LeSourd in 1977. The stories range from chronicles of shamanistic activity and mysterious events of the distant past, through more conventionally historical narratives, to frankly fictional yarns, fairy tales with roots in European traditions, and personal accounts of subsistence activities and reservation life. This entertaining and revealing volume testifies to the rich heritage of the Maliseets and the enduring vibrancy of their culture today.

Philip S. LeSourd is an associate professor of anthropology at Indiana University. He is the author of Accent and Syllable Structure in Passamaquoddy.

Back to Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians

"They Treated Us Just Like Indians:" The Worlds of Bennett County, South Dakota

Paula L. Wagoner
Cloth: 2002, xv
CIP.LC 2002017963 ISBN : 0-8032-4800-8

They Treated Us Just Like Indians book coverOn a typical day in Bennett County, South Dakota, farmers and ranchers work their fields and tend animals, merchants order inventory and stock shelves, teachers plan and teach classes, health workers aid the infirm in the county hospital or clinic, and women make quilts and heirlooms for their families or the county fair. Life is usually unhurried, with time for chatting with neighbors and catching up on gossip. But Bennett County is far from typical.

Nearly a century ago the county was carved out of Pine Ridge Reservation and opened to white settlers. Today Bennett County sits awkwardly between the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Sioux Reservations, with nearly one-third of its land classified as "Indian Country" and the rest considered by many Pine Ridge Lakotas to still belong to the reservation. The county is home to a dynamic population, divided by the residents into three groups—"whites," "fullbloods," and "mixedbloods." Tensions between the three groups lurk amid the quiet harmony of Bennett County's everyday rural life and emerge in moments of community crisis.

In a moving account, anthropologist Paula L. Wagoner tells the story of Bennett County, using snapshots of community events and crises, past and present, to reveal the complexity of race relations and identities there. A homecoming weekend at Bennett County High School becomes a flashpoint for controversy because of the differences of meaning ascribed by the county's three identity groups to the school's team name—the Warriors. At another time, the shooting of a Lakota man by a local non-Indian rancher and the volatile wake that follows demonstrate the impulse to racialize disputes that lies just beneath the surface of everyday life.

Yet such very real problems of identity have not completely overwhelmed Bennett County. Wagoner also shows that despite their differences, residents have managed to find common ground as a region of "diverse insiders" who share an economic dependency on federal funds, distrust outsiders, and, above all, deeply love their land.

Paula L. Wagoner is an assistant professor of anthropology at Juniata College.

Back to Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians

Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians (Interlinear translations) Volume 1 Stories of Alfred Morsette

Douglas R. Parks
Cloth: 1991,xxiv, 684
CIP.LC 90-12889,0-8032-3691-3

Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians (Interlinear translations) Volume 1 book coverUntil the late eighteenth century the Arikaras were one of the largest and most influential Indian groups on the northern plains. For centuries they have lived along the Missouri River, first in present South Dakota, later in what is now North Dakota. Today they share the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in North Dakota with the Mandans and Hidatsas. Although their postcontact history and aspects of their culture are well documented, Douglas R. Parks's monumental four-volume work Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians represents the first comprehensive attempt to describe and record their language and literary traditions. Volumes 1 and 2 present transcriptions of 156 oral narratives in Arikara and include literal interlinear English translations. Volumes 3 and 4 contain free English translations of those narratives, making available for the first time a broad, representative group of Arikara oral traditions that will be invaluable not only to anthropologists and folklorists but to everyone interested in American Indian life and literature. The narratives cover the entire range of traditional stories found in the historical and literary tradition of the Arikara people, who classify their stories into two categories, true stories and tales. Here are myths of ancient times, legends of power bestowed, historical narratives, and narratives of mysterious incidents that affirm the existence today of supernatural power in the world, along with tales of the trickster Coyote and stories of the risque Stuwi and various other animals. In addition, there are accounts of Arikara ritualism: prayers and descriptions of how personal names are bestowed and how the Death Feast originated.

Back to Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians

Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians, Volume 2 Stories of Other Narrators

Douglas R. Parks
Cloth: 1991,xiv,659
CIP.LC 90-12889,0-8032-3692-1

Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians, Volume 2 book coverUntil the late eighteenth century the Arikaras were one of the largest and most influential Indian groups on the northern plains. For centuries they have lived along the Missouri River, first in present South Dakota, later in what is now North Dakota. Today they share the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in North Dakota with the Mandans and Hidatsas. Although their postcontact history and aspects of their culture are well documented, Douglas R. Parks's monumental four-volume work Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians represents the first comprehensive attempt to describe and record their language and literary traditions. Volumes 1 and 2 present transcriptions of 156 oral narratives in Arikara and include literal interlinear English translations. Volumes 3 and 4 contain free English translations of those narratives, making available for the first time a broad, representative group of Arikara oral traditions that will be invaluable not only to anthropologists and folklorists but to everyone interested in American Indian life and literature. The narratives cover the entire range of traditional stories found in the historical and literary tradition of the Arikara people, who classify their stories into two categories, true stories and tales. Here are myths of ancient times, legends of power bestowed, historical narratives, and narratives of mysterious incidents that affirm the existence today of supernatural power in the world, along with tales of the trickster Coyote and stories of the risque Stuwi and various other animals. In addition, there are accounts of Arikara ritualism: prayers and descriptions of how personal names are bestowed and how the Death Feast originated.

Back to Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians

Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians, English Translations, Volume 3 Stories of Alfred Morsette

Douglas R. Parks
Cloth: 1992,xxvi,468
CIP.LC 90-12889,0-8032-3694-8

Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians, English Translations, Volume 3 book coverUntil the late eighteenth century the Arikaras were one of the largest and most influential Indian groups on the northern plains. For centuries they have lived along the Missouri River, first in present South Dakota, later in what is now North Dakota. Today they share the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in North Dakota with the Mandans and Hidatsas. Although their postcontact history and aspects of their culture are well documented, Douglas R. Parks's monumental four-volume work Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians represents the first comprehensive attempt to describe and record their language and literary traditions. Volumes 1 and 2 present transcriptions of 156 oral narratives in Arikara and include literal interlinear English translations. Volumes 3 and 4 contain free English translations of those narratives, making available for the first time a broad, representative group of Arikara oral traditions that will be invaluable not only to anthropologists and folklorists but to everyone interested in American Indian life and literature. The narratives cover the entire range of traditional stories found in the historical and literary tradition of the Arikara people, who classify their stories into two categories, true stories and tales. Here are myths of ancient times, legends of power bestowed, historical narratives, and narratives of mysterious incidents that affirm the existence today of supernatural power in the world, along with tales of the trickster Coyote and stories of the risque Stuwi and various other animals. In addition, there are accounts of Arikara ritualism: prayers and descriptions of how personal names are bestowed and how the Death Feast originated.

Back to Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians

Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians, English Translations, Volume 4 Stories of Other Narrators

Douglas R. Parks
Cloth: 1992,xvii,431
CIP.LC 90-12889,0-8032-3695-6

Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians, Volume 4 book coverUntil the late eighteenth century the Arikaras were one of the largest and most influential Indian groups on the northern plains. For centuries they have lived along the Missouri River, first in present South Dakota, later in what is now North Dakota. Today they share the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in North Dakota with the Mandans and Hidatsas. Although their postcontact history and aspects of their culture are well documented, Douglas R. Parks's monumental four-volume work Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians represents the first comprehensive attempt to describe and record their language and literary traditions. Volumes 1 and 2 present transcriptions of 156 oral narratives in Arikara and include literal interlinear English translations. Volumes 3 and 4 contain free English translations of those narratives, making available for the first time a broad, representative group of Arikara oral traditions that will be invaluable not only to anthropologists and folklorists but to everyone interested in American Indian life and literature. The narratives cover the entire range of traditional stories found in the historical and literary tradition of the Arikara people, who classify their stories into two categories, true stories and tales. Here are myths of ancient times, legends of power bestowed, historical narratives, and narratives of mysterious incidents that affirm the existence today of supernatural power in the world, along with tales of the trickster Coyote and stories of the risque Stuwi and various other animals. In addition, there are accounts of Arikara ritualism: prayers and descriptions of how personal names are bestowed and how the Death Feast originated.

Back to Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians

Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians

Douglas R. Parks
Cloth: 1991
2 Audiocassettes
CIP.LC 90-12889,0-8032-3697-2

Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians book coverUntil the late eighteenth century the Arikaras were one of the largest and most influential Indian groups on the northern plains. For centuries they have lived along the Missouri River, first in present South Dakota, later in what is now North Dakota. Today they share the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in North Dakota with the Mandans and Hidatsas. Although their postcontact history and aspects of their culture are well documented, Douglas R. Parks's monumental four-volume work Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians represents the first comprehensive attempt to describe and record their language and literary traditions. Volumes 1 and 2 present transcriptions of 156 oral narratives in Arikara and include literal interlinear English translations. Volumes 3 and 4 contain free English translations of those narratives, making available for the first time a broad, representative group of Arikara oral traditions that will be invaluable not only to anthropologists and folklorists but to everyone interested in American Indian life and literature. The narratives cover the entire range of traditional stories found in the historical and literary tradition of the Arikara people, who classify their stories into two categories, true stories and tales. Here are myths of ancient times, legends of power bestowed, historical narratives, and narratives of mysterious incidents that affirm the existence today of supernatural power in the world, along with tales of the trickster Coyote and stories of the risque Stuwi and various other animals. In addition, there are accounts of Arikara ritualism: prayers and descriptions of how personal names are bestowed and how the Death Feast originated.

Back to Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians

Wolverine Myths and Visions Dene Traditions from Northern Alberta

Angela Wheelock, Patrick J. Moore
Cloth: 1990,xvi,259
CIP.LC 89-29379,0-8032-8161-7

Wolverine Myths and Visions Dene Traditions from Northern Alberta book coverThe people who call themselves Dene Dhaa, a group of the Athapaskan-speaking Natives of northwestern Canada known as the Slave or Slavey Indians, now number about one thousand and occupy three reserves in northwestern Alberta. Because their settlements were until recently widely dispersed and isolated, they have maintained their language and traditions more successfully than most other Indian groups. This collection of their stories, recorded in the Dene language with literal interlinear English glosses and in a free English translation, represents a major contribution to the documentation of the Dene language, ethnography, and folklore.

Patrick J. Moore is a linguist with the Yukon Native Language Centre; Angela Wheelock is a freelance writer.

Back to Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians

Yuchi Ceremonial Life: Performance, Meaning, and Tradition in a Contemporary American Indian Community

Jason Baird Jackson
Cloth: 2003, xx, 345
CIP.LC 2002031957 ISBN : 0-8032-2594-6

Yuchi Ceremonial Life book coverThe Yuchis are one of the least known yet most distinctive of the Native groups in the American southeast. Located in late prehistoric times in eastern Tennessee, they played an important historical role at various times during the last five centuries and in many ways served as a bridge between their southeastern neighbors and Native communities in the northeast. First noted by the de Soto expedition in the sixteenth century, the Yuchis moved several times and made many alliances over the next few centuries. The famous naturalist William Bartram visited a Yuchi town in 1775, at a time when the Yuchis had moved near and become allied with Creek communities in Georgia. This alliance had long-lasting repercussions: when the United States government forced most southeastern groups to move to Oklahoma in the early nineteenth century, the Yuchis were classified as Creeks and placed under the jurisdiction of the Creek Nation. Today, despite the existence of a separate language and their distinct history, culture, and religious traditions, the Yuchis are not recognized as a sovereign people by the Creek Nation or the United States.

Jason Baird Jackson examines the significance of community ceremonies for the Yuchis today. For many Yuchis, traditional rituals remain important to their identity, and they feel an obligation to perform and renew them each year at one of three ceremonial grounds, called “Big Houses.” The Big House acts as a periodic gathering place for the Yuchis, their Creator, and their ancestors. Drawing on a decade of collaborative study with tribal elders and using insights gained from ethnopoetics, Jackson captures in vivid detail the performance, impact, and motivations behind such rituals as the Stomp Dance, the Green Corn Ceremony, and the Soup Dance and discusses their continuing importance to the community.

Jason Baird Jackson is an assistant curator of ethnology at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History and an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Oklahoma.

Back to Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians

 

Browse all books   1  2  3